Install Theme

theparisreview:

image

 “‘Type,’ said the Foreman, ‘was made to read, / And that should serve as the printer’s creed, / For work on the Linotype machine / Or hand-set jobs should be clear and clean, / Not ornamental, obscure, bizarre, / Composed of all of the fonts there are, / But simple, legible, quiet, plain, / A joy alike to the eye and brain!’”

Type Was Made to Read” from The Legibility of Type. For more on the Linotype, click here

Exodus: Elon Musk argues that we must put a million people on Mars if we are to ensure that humanity has a future →

MODULE 01 by Zoobotics & QFIX Robotics

Concept and design of a modular robotic platform based on a 2DOF leg system. A hole pattern on the aluminum base plate and the leg plates allows the mounting of other components and works with different sensors. The project is developed in cooperation with QFIX Robotics.

(Source: zoobotics.de)

ZURI 02 // Robot System by Zoobotics

ZURI 02 // Robot System by Zoobotics

(Source: zoobotics.de)

ZURI 01 // Paperbot System by Zoobotics

A programmable robot made from paper and chipboard, conceived as a kit that can be assembled with just a few tools (cutter, ruler, cutting mat, Falzbeil, glue and screwdriver). In addition to a distance sensor, servo motors and servo controllers, the paper robot has a Bluetooth module for wireless control via PC or smartphone. ZURI is a modular robotic system, where different combinations of leg and body modules allows for a variety of robot variations.

(Source: zoobotics.de)

brucesterling:

http://blog.longnow.org/02014/09/29/science-fiction-authors-manual-for-civilization/
The Manual for Civilization is a crowd-curated collection of the 3500 books you would most want to sustain or rebuild civilization. It is also the library at The Interval, with about 1000 books on shelves floor-to-ceiling throughout the space. We are about a third of the way done with compiling the list and acquiring selected the titles.
We have a set of four categories to guide selections:
Cultural Canon: Great works of literature, nonfiction, poetry, philosophy, etc
Mechanics of Civilization: Technical knowledge, to build and understand things
Rigorous Science Fiction: Speculative stories about potential futures
Long-term Thinking, Futurism, and relevant history (Books on how to think about the future that may include surveys of the past)
Our list comes from suggestions by Interval donors, Long Now members, and a some specially-invited guests with particular expertise. All the book lists we’ve published so far are shown here including lists from Brian Eno, Stewart Brand, Maria Popova, andNeal Stephenson. Interval donors will be the first to get the full list when it is complete.
Today we add selections from science fiction authors Bruce Sterling, David Brin, and Daniel Suarez. All three are known for using contemporary science and technology as a starting point from which to speculate on the future. And that type of practice is exactly why Science Fiction is one of our core categories….

brucesterling:

http://blog.longnow.org/02014/09/29/science-fiction-authors-manual-for-civilization/

The Manual for Civilization is a crowd-curated collection of the 3500 books you would most want to sustain or rebuild civilization. It is also the library at The Interval, with about 1000 books on shelves floor-to-ceiling throughout the space. We are about a third of the way done with compiling the list and acquiring selected the titles.

We have a set of four categories to guide selections:

  • Cultural Canon: Great works of literature, nonfiction, poetry, philosophy, etc
  • Mechanics of Civilization: Technical knowledge, to build and understand things
  • Rigorous Science Fiction: Speculative stories about potential futures
  • Long-term Thinking, Futurism, and relevant history (Books on how to think about the future that may include surveys of the past)

Our list comes from suggestions by Interval donors, Long Now members, and a some specially-invited guests with particular expertise. All the book lists we’ve published so far are shown here including lists from Brian EnoStewart BrandMaria Popova, andNeal Stephenson. Interval donors will be the first to get the full list when it is complete.

Today we add selections from science fiction authors Bruce SterlingDavid Brin, and Daniel Suarez. All three are known for using contemporary science and technology as a starting point from which to speculate on the future. And that type of practice is exactly why Science Fiction is one of our core categories….

brucesterling:

*Techno as you’ve never heard it before.  Long, long before.
http://bit.ly/GAXknu

brucesterling:

*Techno as you’ve never heard it before.  Long, long before.

http://bit.ly/GAXknu


Certain primordial stars — between 55,000 and 56,000 times the mass of our sun, or solar masses — may have died unusually. In death, these objects — among the universe’s first generation of stars — would have exploded as supernovae and burned completely, leaving no remnant black hole behind.
Certain primordial stars — between 55,000 and 56,000 times the mass of our sun, or solar masses — may have died unusually. In death, these objects — among the universe’s first generation of stars — would have exploded as supernovae and burned completely, leaving no remnant black hole behind.

(Source: sciencedaily.com)

magictransistor:

Ernst Haeckel, Kunstformen der Natur : Art Forms of Nature (Lithographic and Autotype prints), Published in sets of ten between 1899 and 1904.

twistedfork:

I worked on an illustration for HHMI Bulletin’s Fall 2014 Issue with Luke Hayman’s team at Pentagram. The article was about the different mysteries of the brain. 
I wanted to show the form of the brain by using different constellations and heavenly bodies to show. It’s based on the idea that the brain is as mysterious, massive and amazing as space.
Client: Pentagram / HHMIArt Director: Ellen Peterson

twistedfork:

I worked on an illustration for HHMI Bulletin’s Fall 2014 Issue with Luke Hayman’s team at Pentagram. The article was about the different mysteries of the brain. 

I wanted to show the form of the brain by using different constellations and heavenly bodies to show. It’s based on the idea that the brain is as mysterious, massive and amazing as space.

Client: Pentagram / HHMI
Art Director: Ellen Peterson